Tag Archives: directwatercolor

Teaching Day – Secondary Colors and Wet-into-Wet

Purple Beach

This is a wet-in-wet demonstration for my college watercolor class today.

We were also learning how to mix pretty secondary colors. For this painting, I used a cool red (Quinacridone Rose) and a warm blue (Ultramarine Blue).

The background just started as a purple study, but when I turned it vertical it looked like a sunset sky over the water. After it was dry, I added the deep water horizon, the hint of a faraway island, and the palm tree. “Purple Beach” 

If interested in purchasing this painting, click the add to cart button below. $50 without mat or frame. $4.50 shipping if paying through PayPal with a PayPal account or debit/credit card. Additional shipping charges for check payments or those who live outside the Continental U.S.

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“Purple Beach” $50 (no mat or frame)


Fire Lilies (maybe?) Paintings 22 & 23 for Direct Watercolor Challenge

Day 2 of “patio plein air.” Paintings 22 and 23 of the 30×30 Direct Watercolor Challenge. This time I had to paint the blooming orange lilies. I have had several discussions on social about the name of these beautiful lilies. Our best conclusion is that they are the “Asiatic Lily, Orange Matrix” version of lilies. Nice!

Stage 1

I had no video camera to record the painting process, but I did remember to take a few process photos.

Stage 2

I began on wet paper with no pre-drawing. Though, because of the dry Nevada open air, the paper dried quite quickly. I painted the centers of the flowers first with the two warmest yellows on my palette, Hansa Yellow Medium / Deep, plus Permanent Orange (Daniel Smith). I painted the ends of the lily petals with Quinacridone Coral and let the coral swim into the yellow. I then added Quinacridone Rose (cool red) to turn the petals around the bend.

Stage 3

I added some foliage indications with Sap Green (Daniel Smith) and Ultramarine Light (Holbein). I added the Lily buds first with sap green and then the added Permenent Orange in the middles. While the paint was still quite wet, I put in the lily bud centers with one calligraphy line stroke and let the line diffuse.

Trying to paint so many lilies on such a small surface (7.5″x5.5″) left me confused as to where one flower ended and another began. Whew!

I added some light wet yellows and oranges to the top left to hint at more lilies beyond and added hints of new lily underbellies with the Red Rose and Red Coral in the bottom right.

“Fire Lilies” – Final Painting

After the painting dried back a bit, I added the stamen ends with the cool red and a new color Rose of Ultramarine (warm violet), stems with the coral. I couldn’t see the pistils, so I did not paint them. I added some of the Rose of Ultramarine to the foliage and ends of the petals.

I did not care for the painting while painting it, so I set it aside and painted another, focusing on larger flowers, painting one complete flower before moving on to the next.

Fire Lilies Too – Stage 1

Fire Lilies Too – Final Painting

I used the same colors and sequence as the previous painting.

For this one, I left the foreground indistinct instead of the background, painting the colors wet into wet in the foreground.

I let this one be more of a vignette and left the background white and untouched.

After a few days of “staring time,” I quite liked both paintings.

I appreciate all comments, questions, and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.

 

 

#17th Painting 30×30 Watercolor Challenge – Sidewalk Grace

Sidewalk Grace

To continue my Facebook group #30x30DirectWatercolor challenge, I found inspiration on my walk with my husband last Saturday. A beautiful bush of coral roses was overhanging the sidewalk of a corner house. This painting is based on a reference photo taken then.

I wanted this painting to be quick and impressionistic. And I pulled it off this time! It took me only 20 minutes to complete. Yippee! After wetting the paper and drying it back to damp, I added some clear wax scribbles to make sure I did not lose all the white sparkle. Yes, you can add wax when the paper is wet. Thank you to Cheryl Keaveney for discovering this in one of my classes!

I used three reds, Quinacridone Coral (Warm), Quinacridone Red (Cool), and Pyrrol Crimson (dark cool), and Cascade Green for the foliage. All were Daniel Smith Colors.

Stage 1

To begin painting on the damp surface, I mixed up the gray by combining Quin Coral with Cascade Green. I painted around the flowers to call out the figures from the ground. See Stage 1 photo.

Stage 2

Stage 3

I began painting the roses using the Quin Coral, leaving white spaces in addition to the waxed scribbles. I touched in the Quin Red at the back of the flowers, in this case on the left of the blooms, since I wanted to have the light coming from the right. I then added the darker Pyrrol Crimson behind the Quin Red.

Stage 4

I painted in some stems and leaves to connect isolated blooms to the bush, and painted with the green over the top of the reds, leaving some of the red areas to peak through.

I dried off the painting just a bit and added some stronger coral in short curved gentle strokes to indicate the petals on the roses.

Stage 5

I added a few more darks and details and called it done.

It had a lovely little experience painting these almost abstract roses for some “Sidewalk Grace”

The painting is 7.5″x5.5″ on 140lb Arches cold press paper. I used only my #14 Lowe-Cornell round brush, except for my signature. I signed the painting in coral with my liner (rigger) brush.

If you’re interested in purchasing this painting, it’s YOURS for $100 with white black core mat, plus $7.00 shipping to continental U.S. customers, paying with a credit/debit card or with PayPal. Check payments and customers living in faraway lands will incur additional shipping charges. Taxes additional, where applicable (NV residents).

Sidewalk Grace – Final

Sidewalk Grace $100 (with 8×10 mat)

I appreciate all comments, questions, and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.

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14th Painting 30×30 Direct Watercolor – Finch on a Fence

“Oh my goodness! How cute is that Finch?”

“Finch on a Fence” – Fixed a bit

This little guy flitted to a white fence just as my husband and I were walking past with our extra zoomer lens on the Canon Rebel SLR camera at the ready.

“Good Catch!” Now the debate. Is it a House Wren or a House Finch? I just cannot tell. I’m going with a House Finch, because I want the title to be, “Finch on a Fence” <smile>

Continuing with my Facebook group’s 30×30 Direct Watercolor Challenge, I painted this wet-into-wet without any pre-drawing. It is a small 5.5″x7.5″ little guy. It is actually probably very close to the size of the bird itself.

“How did you DO that wet-into-wet without a drawing?” you ask.

Well, I like to saturate the paper, then dry it back with a towel, so I can hold an edge, but still have soft watery blends of color. See previous blog posts on that process.

For this painting, I used my #14 Lowe-Cornell round brush on Arches 140lb cold press watercolor paper.

I mixed up a green tone using Hansa Yellow Medium and Phthalo Blue (GS) both by Daniel Smith.

Finch on a Fence – 1st Sta

I painted around the shape of the bird and fence, leaving them both white. I caressed in a bit of the blue and yellow to the pre-mixed green, just to avoid letting the green get lonesome. I had also pre-mixed my “black” using Pyrrol Red and Phthalo blue, so I caressed in a bit of that to the green too, to knock back the intensity a bit.

After creating the white silhouette, I painted the shadow shapes on the bird’s body, letting the dark bleed into the wet green background. I left a few random white sparkles, plus a very deliberate white highlight in the eye.

Finch on a Fench – Stage Two

I really enjoy how the dark gray bled into the background green, giving the sense of the wind ruffling his feathers. I then carefully put in the bright Pyrrol Red on the top of the head and on the breast. I added a bit of Perinone Orange to keep the red really bright and intense.

I painted in the legs and talons, taking care to make the forward leg darker compared to the back leg. I carefully measured the length of the talons against the bird’s body, so I didn’t make them too small. Birds have BIG feet, man!

I weakened the gray mix and hinted at the white

Finch on a Fence – Stage 3

fence on top and on the front. I liked the cast shadow from the Bird’s tail, which I painted with a weakened phthalo blue and a bit of muddy gray the same strength. I was quite happy with the painting at this stage. And it would have been a completely bona fide wet-into-wet one- go-at-it painting. But alas! One of the house critics came by and offered that the background was pretty boring.

“Yeah, I know. It is.” So, when the painting had reached the damp, almost dry stage, I added hints of foliage behind the white fence. I signed it with my calligraphy brush, because dang it, if I can’t find my rigger brush!

Voila! My cuter than a dang bug’s ear (though, is a bug’s ear really cute? I mean, how do we know that? Intellectually, my brain thinks a bug’s ear would not be cute?) “Finch on a Fence” watercolor painting for the day.

If interested in purchasing this painting, click the “Add to Cart” button below. For a short time, this painting will be available for $150 (with black frame and white black core mat). Shipping $15.00 to Continental U.S. customers, paying with PayPal or a credit/debit card only. Check payments and faraway folks will pay additional shipping charges. Taxes additional, where applicable.

After July 8th, this little fellow is “goin’ to the show!” at Artsy Fartsy Art Gallery in Carson City. Artist’s reception July 18th from 4-7pm.

Finch on a Fench – Final painting

Finch on a Fench, $150 (with frame & mat)

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13th Painting 30×30 Direct Watercolor – George’s Gift

George’s Gift

The lucky 13th painting comes in a day late because I really did need a recovery day.

Now I have to paint two in one day to catch up.

But… The Miller-Reynolds Manor had a surprise visitor for the weekend, so the doubled up painting session may have to wait.

This painting is based on a flower arrangement given to me by my previous visitor week or so ago. My good friend George Schkudor from Ogden, Utah. I love daisies and mums because they are so long-lived.

For the challenge, I am still painting without a pre-drawing and wet-into-wet. I did use a clear wax crayon to save whites on the light side of the main spider mum. I intended to go a little “wild and crazy” with the paint application, so I had to save some of the white. I wet the paper thoroughly on both sides and let it “cook.” I prepared some cobalt and ultramarine blue as well as some quinacridone red and rose in my palette mixing area. I try not to draw paint directly from the paint wells because then I cannot control the pigment strength.

I dried back the paper a bit with a paper towel and started carving around the white mum with some red and blue.  I put some shapes of green (mixed with the ultramarine, new gamboge and a little of the quin red) in and around some purple “flowers.”

I splattered some of all the blues and reds all around. I lifted some color back with a palette knife. I added iridescent medium and texture medium. I scraped back some more, with the palette as well as my fingernails. I sprayed the bottom third of the painting with my water bottle (misting spray). I tilted the painting and let the wet paint run down. I added some dark green leaves, and let them swim around in the wet and texture medium. I mixed up a gray with all the colors, leaning toward purple and painted the mum petals a bit on the dark side of the flower. I scraped some more petals to create the purple mums’ petals. I added some loose and indistinct calligraphy strokes using Rose of Ultramarine and Quinacridone Red. The paper was still wet, so the strokes diffused nicely.

Painting and source bouquet

Loosey goosey fun, it was! Here is a photo of the painting with its source (under yellow light, so the colors look a bit different.

The challenge is keeping me in the paints. ‘Tis good. Now away to visit with the patriarch of the Reynolds Family, my most senior of brothers.

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If interested in purchasing this painting, “George’s Gift” for $100 (plus taxes and/or shipping, where applicable), just click the “Add to Cart” button below. Check payments and orders outside the continental U.S. will incur additional shipping charges.

“George’s Gift” $100

I appreciate all comments, questions, and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.

 

11th Painting 30×30 Direct Watercolor – White Roses

“White Roses” – Click on image for a larger view

Continuing with the #30x30DirectWatercolor challenge, here is my effort for day 11. I have spent much of the day preparing for a couple of watercolor classes that I teach tomorrow, so I had to make this one quick; which sometimes works in my favor. According to my video recording, this took me about 37 minutes from start to finish.

See my previous blog post to admire the source photo, which of course I adapted.

I used a lovely “separatey,” combination color, called Shadow Violet, plus my Cobalt Blue Violet, Hansa Yellow Medium, Cascade Green (all by Daniel Smith), and my trusty Ultramarine Light by Holbein.

I wet the paper thoroughly, both front and back. While the paper was “cooking” in the water, I prepared my pigments in the palette.

After the paper had soaked properly, I dried it back with paper towels and my terry towel “squeegee” so I could hold an edge, but still have soft transitions.

With my #14 Lowe-Cornell Round brush, I started by carving around the white shapes of the roses with the Shadow Violet and Ultramarine blue. Again, as in accordance with the Facebook challenge, I did not do any pre-drawing.

I painted in the foliage area with Cascade green and Hansa Yellow Medium, some Ultramarine Blue and Shadow Violet, letting all the colors swim around in the wetness. I then worked on the shadows on the flowers, starting with light (weak) pigment with grayed down violets and blue. After the paper had dried back slightly, I built up the petal and foliage shapes with stronger pigment. When the paper was dried back to damp almost dry, I added some final calligraphy strokes for the stems, petal shapes, and leaves. I signed the painting using a #0 liner (rigger) brush with long thin hairs.

The painting, “White Roses,” is 7.5″x5.5″ painted on 140lb Arches brand cold press.  I do have video clips of the painting process. I may edit it someday. Stay tuned! (A 45-minute video tutorial link ($6) is available. Contact Colleen for details).

This painting has been updated: See blog post Whites and Watercolor for June 7, 2019

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If you’re interested in purchasing this painting, you can buy it now via PayPal for $165 (w/ exquisite white gold frame and white mat). Just click on the “Add to Cart” button below. You do NOT need a PayPal account, just a valid credit or debit card. Shipping is $15 for Continental US orders. Check payments or international orders will incur additional shipping charges. The painting will be mailed via the U.S. Postal Service. Nevada customers subject to sales taxes (sorry).

I appreciate all comments, questions, and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.

White Roses, $165 (w/ frame & mat)

 

 

 

 

 

9th & 10th Paintings for Challenge – Yellow Headed Blackbirds

Yellow-Headed Blackbird One

Today I couldn’t resist my yellow-headed blackbird friend. He and I had a conversation on my walk the other day. I don’t know if he was pleased to see me. I think he thought I might threaten his nest. Have you ever heard these birds? Man, do they like to screech! But they also have a cute chirp when you get close to have a “talk.”

I painted him twice. No pre-drawing for either rendition. I quite like both outcomes. I know tomorrow is going to be a busy day. I start teaching my watercolor class at Western Nevada College. I thought I’d better paint two paintings today, just in case I don’t have time tomorrow.

Yellow-Headed Blackbird Too

For the first study, I waxed off the white wing tips, then saturated the paper front and back. While the paper was “cooking in the water,” I prepared my paints in the palette: I used Hansa Yellow Medium and Deep for the light areas of the head, and Raw Sienna Light for the yellow shadow areas (all Daniel Smith). I mixed Ultramarine Light (Holbein) with Pyrrol Transparent Orange (Daniel Smith) for the darks on the body. For the background and trees, I added Cascade Green (Daniel Smith). I also used all the bird colors in the background to promote harmony.

For the second study, I used the same color combinations, but my process was different. I wetted the background area but kept paper where I wanted the bird dry. I did not use wax for the wing tips. I dropped in weak blue and green while the paper was wet and puddly and let the paint swim around and blend on the paper. I then dried the paper back to damp before working on the bird itself.

I like both paintings. I think the second is more accurate proportions, but I like the softness of the first study. What do you think?

I have video clips for both paintings. I may edit them someday. Stay tuned!

If you are interested in purchasing either of these paintings ($150 for top painting, which is framed, or $100 for bottom painting with mat only), I have included a convenient Buy Now button below <smile>. PayPal is my credit card processor. You do NOT need a PayPal account to purchase, just a valid credit or debit card.

Both paintings are 5×5″x7.5″ on 140lb Arches cold press paper. Under the “Choose Painting” options; “One” is the first image, “Too” is the second painting.

Both paintings will be delivered via the USPS postal service. Shipping cost is $15 only if purchased via PayPal checkout (Check payments will incur additional shipping charges). Taxes are additional, where applicable. If the unframed painting is purchased, the shipping charge is only $4.50 and the customer will be refunded extra charges via PayPal).


Choose Painting



I appreciate all comments, questions and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.

 

2nd Painting 30×30 Direct Watercolor Challenge – Iris

“Wild Iris” Click for larger view

Wild Iris with Source Flower

Since I started the #30x30DirectWatercolor Challenge a day late, I found myself painting two paintings on June 2nd. We have thing subtle and delicate wild irises blooming in our front garden at the moment. I picked one to decorate my guest’s bedside table over the weekend. This day it was starting to curl and wither, so thought I had better paint it while I could. I wanted this one to be a lot simpler. I found myself double stroking and overworking. Sigh.

If you’re curious, the painting is on a quarter sheet of Arches 140lb cold press. I used my trusty Lowe-Cornell #14 round brush. I wanted vibrant violets (that alliterates nicely, huh?), so I used my warm blues (Ultramarine Light by Holbein and Cobalt Blue by Daniel Smith) and cool reds (Quinacridone Red and Rose by Daniel Smith). I started with the yellow stripe on the petals using Hansa Yellow Medium and Deep. For the greens, I went back to my trusty Cascade Green and skewed it to yellow-green and blue-green, using the same blues and yellows.

I did not saturate the paper entirely but just wet the area for the petals. I have decided I like it better to wet the whole paper. The flower is too large. It lost its grace. Sigh. But I’m posting the good, bad, and the ugly… Hopefully, only better from this.

I appreciate all comments, questions, and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.