Tag Archives: painting

Walking Down the Street, Pretty Woman

Walking Down the Street, Pretty Woman

Portrait #30 for my 30×30 Portrait challenge. “Walking Down the Street, Pretty Woman” watercolor 11″x7.5″ on 140lb Arches Cold Press. Portrait #30 on the 30th! Whew! Click on the images for a larger view in new browser tabs.

I dashed off the sketch in the morning, then had to finish up two paintings after my watercolor class to meet the 30×30 goal, but I did it! Yay!

I saturated the paper front and back. While the paper soaked, I mixed up five “piles” of paint to a milky strength; Rose of Ultramarine, Raw Sienna Light, Pyrrol Red, Cascade Green (by Daniel Smith), and Ultramarine Blue (by Holbein). I then dried the paper back to damp.

Sketch

I started with the background, painting around the whites, letting the colors mix on the paper (rather than in the palette). I used the blue, RoU, and Cascade Green and a bit of Raw Sienna for the background colors.

For the hair, I painted the first layer with Raw Sienna Light, then moved to the skin tones, adding some Pyrrol Red to the mix. I used my S-Caress stroke to keep all the edges soft and indistinct. I fixed the shoulder width between the drawing and painting, bringing the shoulder and arm shadows in closer to the body.

I used a light layer of Cascade Green for the blouse base, then added some Ultramarine Blue and let the paint swim around to create the impression of a fabric pattern. The hardest part around the torso was the hand. Keeping it indistinct but accurate (I hope).

I mixed all the colors together to create a dark for the shadows in the hair. I used an Ultramarine base for the eye sockets and irises of the eye,  but painted the eyelashes and brows with the same murky dark. I used the Ultramarine Blue and Cascade green with some Rose of Ultramarine for the soft shadows in the face and neck. I could probably still fix some things, but I like the freshness of it as it is.

If you are interested in purchasing this painting for $185 unframed (plus tax and or shipping, where applicable). It comes with a custom mat, sized to fit in a standard 14″x11″ frame.

Just click the Buy Now button below. Easy Peasy.

Buy Now $185

 

Yohannes

Yohannes

Portrait #28 for my 30×30 Portrait Challenge. “Yohannes” watercolor 11″x7.5″ on 140 lb Arches cold press. Click on the image for a larger view in your browser.

Yohannes was the model today for the Portrait Society of Reno weekly Wednesday sessions. What a great model! He sat like a statue and provided us with SUCH a great look.

I spent the first 20-minute-pose on the drawing. Taking care to pay attention to angles, proportions, and Interrelationships. The rest of the painting I finished in 3 more 20-minute-poses.

I worked a wet brush on dry paper.

Sitter with Painting

I really enjoyed his glasses, deep orange skin tones, and dark beard. I decided to bring the violet tones in the backdrop to the shadows in the face and clothing. It contrasted nicely with the orange skin tones, don’t you think?

I used mostly Transparent Pyrrol Orange (Daniel Smith), Cobalt Blue Violet (Daniel Smith), and Crimson Lake (Holbein). I did use a bit of Raw Sienna Light (Daniel Smith) for the highlights on the cheek, nose, and neck. I used mostly crimson for the lips but decided I needed a warmer red, so I brought in Pyrrol Red in the end. Since I used the Pyrrol Red on the lips, I had to put touches of it elsewhere around the painting; on the bridge of the nose, side of the nostril, cheekbones, and brow. I also mixed some Pyrrol, TPO, and CBV for the darks in the beard, hat, etc.

The violet, orange, and crimson combination just did not gray down enough for the clothing. I mixed the Crimson with some Cascade Green (Daniel Smith), Pyrrol and Phthalo to get a rich, rich dark. Cascade Green is a mix of Phthalo Blue and Raw Sienna, though, so it’s not like a whole ‘nuther color.. hahaha. I may want to make a few minor adjustments around the neck and glasses. Or I may just leave it alone? Call it a truly live-sitting painting? Whattaya think?

I really think I caught Yohannes’ likeness. He seems like one of those really nice men; smart, kind, and it didn’t hurt that he was so handsome <smile>. I hope I have the opportunity to paint him again someday.

Little Veil – Painting

Little Veil

Portrait #23 of my 30×30 Portrait Challenge. “Little Veil” watercolor 7.5″x11″ on 140lb Arches cold press. Click on images for a larger view in a new browser tab.

I mixed up 5 tea strength piles of pigment: Rose of Ultramarine (RoU), Cascade Green and Raw Sienna Light (RSL) by Daniel Smith;  Cobalt Blue by QoR, and Translucent Orange by Schminke. I saturated the paper front and back, then dried it back to damp.

I wetted the shadow shapes again then “S-caressed” in the RoU, RSL, and Translucent Orange for the skin tones, using the Cascade Green for the light side and the shadows ad Cobalt in the eye sockets. I painted around the highlights in the eyes (by not wetting the paper there).

I used a combination of the Cobalt, RoU, and Translucent Orange for the hair, letting the colors mix on the paper (not in the palette!).

I wet the background and gently painted caressed in tea strength RoU and Cascade Green in the background, Letting the two colors both mix and be independent, so it was soft and blended. I let all the color bleed out a bit.

I took a break to handle a customer. Yay! Afterward, the paper had dried back just the right amount. I started to build up the value tones. Starting with the dark eyes. I brought in some Payne’s Blue Gray (or maybe Indanthrone Blue?) by Daniel Smith, mixed it with the Translucent Orange to create a dark brown for the hair and the eyes. I used RoU for the lips and nostrils. With a tiny bit of blue where the lips joined and in the corners of the mouth.

I called out the neck and back of the hair with a stronger mix of Cascade Green, then blended in some RoU to neutralize the colors.

I enjoy the painting. I REALLY captured a likeness this time. I like the softness on the edges and focus on the features with the hair falling across them.

This may be my favorite skin tone combination now? Who will I draw or paint tomorrow? Stay tuned.

All Smiles Now – Painting (SOLD)

All Smiles Now

Portrait #15 of my 30 x 30 Portrait Challenge. “All Smiles Now” watercolor 11″x7.5″ on Arches 140lb cold press watercolor paper.

Swatches

If you saw my last post, you saw my value study. During the painting process, I tried to only refer to the drawing, rather than the source photo. I played around with some different pigment options before beginning the painting. I wanted the colors to be softer than some previous portraits I have done for this challenge. I settled on the combination on the bottom (see Swatches image); Quinacridone Red and Coral, Raw Sienna Light, and Manganese Blue Hue.

I saturated the paper front and back. While the paper soaked, I mixed up my pigment piles, plus a violet mix with the rose and manganese. I dried the paper back to damp, but wet the shadow areas again, so I could drop the colors in and let them swim around together, without worrying about the colors floating in the drier paper. Damp paper will hold a soft edge. On dry paper, the edges dry too hard for my liking, especially for a little girl subject.

I put down a thin layer of blue in the eye sockets, under the nose and mouth to start, then applied rose, coral, and raw sienna next to the blue to let them mix on the paper. I then gently caressed the colors together.

I left the highlights in the eye dry, so they would stay white. Not the “whites of the eye,” though. just the highlight that crosses the iris and pupil. The “whites” are actually quite dark, sort of gray tones. I like to have a blue base for the eye socket and the teeth. When I’m painting a big smile, I avoid yellow anywhere near the teeth because it makes them look decayed.

I slowly built up the value layers, being careful to soften all the transitions while the paint was wet. I only wanted hard edges around the eyes and mouth. For the hair, I used mostly raw sienna, with purple shadows. I did have to bring in some Cobalt Blue Violet in order to create the darks in the mouth and eyes. The manganese blue is too high value to achieve the darks.

I’m not sure the painting is complete yet. As I look at it, I may make a few adjustments. But then sometimes we have to be brave enough to quit when it’s 80% done, to avoid that overworked look? I’ll sleep on it. Stay tuned. Compare to value study drawing. Does it look like the same little girl? I did use my drawing to trace up the contours for the painting. Click on images for a larger view.

This painting has SOLD.

All Smiles Now – Drawing

All Smiles Now – Watercolor, 11″x7.5″

 

Teaching Day – Secondary Colors and Wet-into-Wet

Purple Beach

This is a wet-in-wet demonstration for my college watercolor class today.

We were also learning how to mix pretty secondary colors. For this painting, I used a cool red (Quinacridone Rose) and a warm blue (Ultramarine Blue).

The background just started as a purple study, but when I turned it vertical it looked like a sunset sky over the water. After it was dry, I added the deep water horizon, the hint of a faraway island, and the palm tree. “Purple Beach” 

If interested in purchasing this painting, click the add to cart button below. $50 without mat or frame. $4.50 shipping if paying through PayPal with a PayPal account or debit/credit card. Additional shipping charges for check payments or those who live outside the Continental U.S.

Thank you for subscribing! If you have not already turned it on, you have two options in the right column of the blog; either RSS feed (click the orange/white icon) or by email (click the words “Subscribe to Colleen Reynolds, Artist by Email”).

 

“Purple Beach” $50 (no mat or frame)


Fire Lilies (maybe?) Paintings 22 & 23 for Direct Watercolor Challenge

Day 2 of “patio plein air.” Paintings 22 and 23 of the 30×30 Direct Watercolor Challenge. This time I had to paint the blooming orange lilies. I have had several discussions on social about the name of these beautiful lilies. Our best conclusion is that they are the “Asiatic Lily, Orange Matrix” version of lilies. Nice!

Stage 1

I had no video camera to record the painting process, but I did remember to take a few process photos.

Stage 2

I began on wet paper with no pre-drawing. Though, because of the dry Nevada open air, the paper dried quite quickly. I painted the centers of the flowers first with the two warmest yellows on my palette, Hansa Yellow Medium / Deep, plus Permanent Orange (Daniel Smith). I painted the ends of the lily petals with Quinacridone Coral and let the coral swim into the yellow. I then added Quinacridone Rose (cool red) to turn the petals around the bend.

Stage 3

I added some foliage indications with Sap Green (Daniel Smith) and Ultramarine Light (Holbein). I added the Lily buds first with sap green and then the added Permenent Orange in the middles. While the paint was still quite wet, I put in the lily bud centers with one calligraphy line stroke and let the line diffuse.

Trying to paint so many lilies on such a small surface (7.5″x5.5″) left me confused as to where one flower ended and another began. Whew!

I added some light wet yellows and oranges to the top left to hint at more lilies beyond and added hints of new lily underbellies with the Red Rose and Red Coral in the bottom right.

“Fire Lilies” – Final Painting

After the painting dried back a bit, I added the stamen ends with the cool red and a new color Rose of Ultramarine (warm violet), stems with the coral. I couldn’t see the pistils, so I did not paint them. I added some of the Rose of Ultramarine to the foliage and ends of the petals.

I did not care for the painting while painting it, so I set it aside and painted another, focusing on larger flowers, painting one complete flower before moving on to the next.

Fire Lilies Too – Stage 1

Fire Lilies Too – Final Painting

I used the same colors and sequence as the previous painting.

For this one, I left the foreground indistinct instead of the background, painting the colors wet into wet in the foreground.

I let this one be more of a vignette and left the background white and untouched.

After a few days of “staring time,” I quite liked both paintings.

I appreciate all comments, questions, and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.

 

 

18th Painting 30×30 Watercolor Challenge – My Neighbor’s Roses

“My Neighbor’s Roses”

Continuing with my Facebook group’s 30×30 Direct Watercolor Challenge, I painted this little study of the roses creeping over our back fence from the neighbor’s bushes. Now some might think this an intrusion, but each June we welcome the beautiful color. For this painting, I enjoyed the purple cast shadows resulting from the early morning light. My brother actually called my attention to the scene before he headed off for work. I have two amazing artistic resources in my household. My brother, who also paints, and my husband, who points a camera lens around to great effect. Both have taught me much.

I began painting without any drawing, with a wet surface, using my trusty #14 Lowe Cornell round brush on Arches 140lb cold press paper. I used a photo reference.

This time, I began painting positively with the figure, rather than the ground. I used four reds, Pyrrol Red (warm), Quinacridone Red (cool), Pyrrol Crimson (cool and dark), and Quinacridone Coral (warm). This time I used Sap Green (warm) and Ultramarine Light (warm) for the foliage. All pigments are Daniel Smith brand except the Ultramarine Light (Holbein). I used the Pyrrol red for the light side of the roses, and Quin Red in the shadows. This for the bunch at the left that was in the light. I wanted to indicate the right bunch was in shadow, so I used Quin red and Pyrrol Crimson for that grouping.

Stage 1

Stage 2

I mixed up a neutral brown with the Sap Green and Quin Red for the background fence. I skewed the green to blue for the shadow areas of foliage. I left a white edge on the left to indicate light direction, and let the shadow side bleed into the fence. I added straight Sap Green into some areas of the red for foliage indications. Adding the green on to of the red had the effect of neutralizing the leaves to olive green, but some areas showed bright and warm. I tried hard not to lose all the white sparkles.

Stage 3

For the cast shadows (my favorite part of the painting!), I waited until the paper had dried back some. I mixed the Pyrrol Crimson with the Ultramarine to achieve a nice violet mix. When I touched the shadows on top of the brown fence, the intensity was knocked back a bit. I loved the resulting violet tones. I added some boards and planks on the fencing using the same violet tone. For the light side of the angular support plank, I dry-brushed some Ultramarine Light.

Stage 4

I let the paper dry back even more, and indicated some petals on the rose bunch in the light with Pyrrol Red and Quin Coral. In the shady bunch, I used Pyrrol Crimson to indicate shadows. For these strokes, I almost just “scribbled” with the tip of my brush.

A note on the process images. I usually videotape when I paint. It helps me remember my sequence. It is a great learning tool, both for me and my watercolor students. But I really don’t have time (or the storage capacity) to edit every video of every painting, so this is a nice compromise, right? These process images are screenshots taken from the video clip, hence the blurry quality. The photo of the final painting was taken with my SLR camera, though, and shows the details a bit better.

My Neighbor’s Roses – Final Painting

If you’re interested in purchasing this painting, it can be had for the low, low price of $150 (she is all dressed up with her mat and ready for a show). Shipping is $15.00 if you live in the Continental U.S. and pay through PayPal with a PayPal account or a credit/debit card. Check payments and shipping to those in distant lands will incur additional shipping charges. Nevada residents have to pay sales tax (sorry).

My Neighbor’s Roses $150 (w/frame & mat).

I appreciate all comments, questions, and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.

 

#17th Painting 30×30 Watercolor Challenge – Sidewalk Grace

Sidewalk Grace

To continue my Facebook group #30x30DirectWatercolor challenge, I found inspiration on my walk with my husband last Saturday. A beautiful bush of coral roses was overhanging the sidewalk of a corner house. This painting is based on a reference photo taken then.

I wanted this painting to be quick and impressionistic. And I pulled it off this time! It took me only 20 minutes to complete. Yippee! After wetting the paper and drying it back to damp, I added some clear wax scribbles to make sure I did not lose all the white sparkle. Yes, you can add wax when the paper is wet. Thank you to Cheryl Keaveney for discovering this in one of my classes!

I used three reds, Quinacridone Coral (Warm), Quinacridone Red (Cool), and Pyrrol Crimson (dark cool), and Cascade Green for the foliage. All were Daniel Smith Colors.

Stage 1

To begin painting on the damp surface, I mixed up the gray by combining Quin Coral with Cascade Green. I painted around the flowers to call out the figures from the ground. See Stage 1 photo.

Stage 2

Stage 3

I began painting the roses using the Quin Coral, leaving white spaces in addition to the waxed scribbles. I touched in the Quin Red at the back of the flowers, in this case on the left of the blooms, since I wanted to have the light coming from the right. I then added the darker Pyrrol Crimson behind the Quin Red.

Stage 4

I painted in some stems and leaves to connect isolated blooms to the bush, and painted with the green over the top of the reds, leaving some of the red areas to peak through.

I dried off the painting just a bit and added some stronger coral in short curved gentle strokes to indicate the petals on the roses.

Stage 5

I added a few more darks and details and called it done.

It had a lovely little experience painting these almost abstract roses for some “Sidewalk Grace”

The painting is 7.5″x5.5″ on 140lb Arches cold press paper. I used only my #14 Lowe-Cornell round brush, except for my signature. I signed the painting in coral with my liner (rigger) brush.

If you’re interested in purchasing this painting, it’s YOURS for $100 with white black core mat, plus $7.00 shipping to continental U.S. customers, paying with a credit/debit card or with PayPal. Check payments and customers living in faraway lands will incur additional shipping charges. Taxes additional, where applicable (NV residents).

Sidewalk Grace – Final

Sidewalk Grace $100 (with 8×10 mat)

I appreciate all comments, questions, and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.

Don’t forget to subscribe – two options in the right column of this blog.

 

16th Painting 30×30 Direct Watercolor Challenge – Mrs Cluck

Mrs. Cluck – Final Painting

Mrs. Cluck continues my efforts for the Facebook 30x30DirectWatercolor Challenge.

This is a small work created on Arches 140lb cold press, painted without any drawing and wet-into-wet. I used my #14 Lowe-Cornell round brush throughout. Pigments used are Raw Sienna Light, Hansa Yellow Medium, Quinacridone Red, Pyrrol Red and Cobalt Blue (all Daniel Smith).

Mrs. Cluck – 1st Stage

I saturated the paper, then dried it back with a towel (see previous blog posts). I began by painting the shadow side of the bird with Raw Sienna and Hansa Yellow Medium.

Mrs. Cluck  (Headless chicken) – 2nd Stage

I then found the bird by painting around with a background color, using the cobalt and pyrrol red, then dropping in some of the raw sienna as well. This created a silhouette of the main subject. In some places, I purposely let the yellow color bleed into the background color, in other areas I kept a white “reservoir” edge.

Mrs. Cluck (She found her head) – 3rd Stage

To find the chicken’s comb and wattle, I dropped in the Quinacridone Red while the yellow pigment was very wet. After hinting at the head wet-into-wet, I had to let the painting dry back a bit to the damp stage.

Mrs. Cluck – 4th Stage

After the paper was damp (not wet), I painted some darker shadow shapes in an around the chicken’s head.  I added some soft shadow indications in the feathers, legs, and feet.

Mrs. Cluck – Final Painting (Click on image for a larger view)

After the painting had dried some more to almost dry, I touched in some more shadow details to finish the painting.

Mrs. Cluck, 7.5″x5.5 watercolor.  If interested in purchasing this painting, it can be had for a mere $150 (with frame & mat). In July, “Mrs. Cluck” will be “goin’ to the show.” She will be a part of my featured artist show with Artsy Fartsy Art Gallery in Carson City. Check payers and those who live far, far away will incur additional shipping charges. Taxes additional, where applicable.

Mrs. Cluck $150 (with frame & mat)


I appreciate all comments, questions, and suggestions.

Thank you for stopping by.

15th Painting 30×30 Direct Watercolor – Jonesy Boy

Jonesy Boy

I couldn’t resist. This is my second painting for June 15th. I am now caught up! with the 30×30 Direct Watercolor Challenge! If I post this today, it will show the 15th painting on the 15th day of June.

I will not expound on it too much on the painting process. I will just say it is a 5.5″x7.5″ direct (no pre-drawing), wet-into-wet. The paper had dried back significantly before I finished, but it was done all in one go, no glazing.

I used Pyrrol Red, Phthalo Blue and Raw Sienna Light for the fur and background. I brought in just a bit of Hansa Yellow Medium for the eyes. All Daniel Smith Brand pigments. It is on Arches 140lb cold press paper.

After staring at this for a bit, I felt compelled to make a few adjustments. The nose was too long and he was a bit narrow between the eyes. I couldn’t “really” fix it, but the few changes helped, me thinks. You?

To purchase this painting for $150 with a black frame and a white black core mat (plus shipping), click the “Add to Cart” button below. Check and international payments incur additional shipping charges. Taxes additional, where applicable.

Jonesy Boy – After a few adjustments

Jonesy Boy $150 (w/ frame & mat)


I appreciate all comment, questions, and suggestions. Thank you for stopping by.