Tag Archives: teaching

Bachelor Party

“Bachelor Party”

Painting #8 in my Big Bird March (but continuing in April) challenge. This is my “Bachelor Party” painting, collaged from a selection of photos of some house sparrows who hang outside my kitchen window. The female sparrows visit also, but they are more camera shy. I think the males may actually consider me a threat when they “pose” and glare at me through the window. This is a 7.5″x11″ watercolor painting on 140lb Arches cold press. Click on each image to see a larger view in a new browser tab.

“Bachelor Party” Drawing

I have skipped blogging about a couple of bird paintings. The paintings are nothing I want to brag about. I have quit counting the number of total birds, since this one alone means 10 separate birds!

Rather than give you a long written explanation of the painting process, I will just include an accelerated video of selected clips in the painting process. If a picture is worth a 1000 words, how many words is a video worth, I wonder?

Anyway, I used just four pigments throughout the painting; in order of their appearance in the video, Pyrrol Transparent Orange, New Gamboge (both by Daniel Smith), Ultramarine Light (Holbein), and Quinacridone Rose (Also by Daniel Smith).

I quite like the somewhat abstract nature of the painting and drawing. These guys will probably end up on a note card some day, or as a packet of bird cards. My usual rule is I don’t make prints of paintings unless I no longer have access to the original painting. So I may wait to see if this little guy sells? Or I may make a coronavirus exception to the rule? I’m not sure yet.

Enjoy the video of the painting process. There are no words, just moving pictures (worth thousands and thousands of words).

If you are interested in purchasing this painting, it is available via my Self Shop https://Self.com/CRME-Exploring-Watercolor. For details, you can click the convenient button below.

As always, I hope you will consider subscribing to this GREAT blog. See sign up option to the right (on a computer), or below (on a personal device). Thanks for stopping by.

“Western Tanagers”

“Western Tanagers”

Birds 6, 7, and 8 for my 15×30 Big Bird March (I did not blog about bird #5 as I did not like it). Is it fair to count three birds in one painting as three? My challenge, my rules, right? Ha! I have a workshop to teach and host this weekend, so I need to surge ahead of schedule. Click on the image to see a larger view in your browser. I painted on 140lb Saunders Waterford cold press paper.

We love seeing these beautiful Western Tanagers flashing past us in the Spring and Summer months. We managed to catch some photos of them in some evergreens. I often cannot distinguish the Tanager from the Oriole at a distance, the female especially. When we returned home, we compared the photos against “The Bird Book” and “The Google.” These guys (and gal) were definitely Western Tanagers. Real birders probably would not need to consult The Google?

I combined four photos to come up with the composition; one of the blurry tanager in the background, two for the female, and one for the main male in the foreground.

I painted wet-into-wet, using Pyrrol Scarlet, Hansa Yellow Medium, Phthalo Blue (GS) and Quinacridone Rose (all by Daniel Smith). I’m going to let the Youtube video of the painting stages suffice for the process description this time.

The painting is 7.5″x11″ in a custom white mat with a black core to fit a standard 11″x14″ frame opening. Shipping $7 (if the painting does not need to be shipped, the shipping charge will be refunded). $185

Peaches!

Peaches!

Another day away from my furry friends of February challenge. I taught two classes in my studio today, back-to-back. “Peaches!” watercolor 7.5″x5.5″ on 140 lb Arches cold press. Click on the image to bring up a larger view in a new browser tab.

This is an impromptu demo painting of some peaches. Photo by Jackie Estes of her very own juicy peach tree from last summer. “How would I approach this painting?” She asked. So I showed her. 

We used New Gamboge, Quinacridone Rose (by Daniel Smith), and Ultramarine Blue (by Holbein). I started wet and swimmy by dropping in areas of color on the really wet surface, letting the colors mix on the paper. After it was dry, I then called out the hard edges on the peaches and around the leaves. Fun. I like the variation of in-focus out-of-focus and the contrast at the focal point.

Sometimes it is good not to have enough time to “finish” a painting <smile>.

The painting is for sale, $95 (plus shipping $7 and taxes where applicable). Price includes a white mat with a black core, backing board, and a cellophane bag covering. The outside edge of the mat is 10″x8″ to fit in a standard-sized frame.

$95

 

 

Coffee Shop Reader

Coffee Shop Reader – First Stage

Starbucks Reader – Final

Portrait #27 for my 30×30 Portrait Challenge. “Coffee Shop Reader” watercolor 11″x7.5″ on 140lb Arches cold press. Click on images for a larger view in a new browser tab.

This is a WIP (Work-in-progress). I started wet-into-wet with a triadic secondary color harmony scheme; Cobalt Blue Violet, Transparent Pyrrol Orange, and Cascade Green by Daniel Smith. Though, I also used Raw Sienna Light for the skin tones. I painted in value layers, reaching the 3rd layer of value.

I had to stop prematurely due to other commitments. I hope to resume painting today and start the next.

I think it is a good start. Though, I need to warm up the skin tones, fix the fabric folds and straighten the bricks. Oh, and the hand could use some work as well. Major surgery? Stay tuned!

I did all those things I said I would do. What do you think? Better?

 

 

Creating Jack

Creating Jack – Final

Portrait #26 for my 30×30 Portrait Challenge. “Creating Jack” watercolor 7.5″x11″ on 140lb Arches cold press. Click on images for a larger view in a new browser tab.

 

Photo courtesy of Alethia Harmon, the boy’s mother. Along with the previous portrait, the boy and his little brother were doing Halloween preparations. I had done the outline drawing directly on the watercolor paper the previous day.

I wanted to have a dominant triadic color harmony this time secondary colors for this painting; violet, orange and green.

Creating Jack – First Draft

I began by saturating the paper front and back. While the paper soaked I mixed up milky piles of Cobalt Blue Violet, Cascade Green, Transparent Pyrrol Orange, and Raw Sienna Light.

I dried back the paper to damp in the background areas and the shirt. I used a combination of the green and violet to create a dark. I used orange and violet for a base on the hair. The hair and face areas were still really wet, so I had lost edges between the foreground and background. I had some of the orange to the background as well. I used orange and Raw Sienna Light for the skin tones. I did bring in some Quinacridone Rose on the face and arm as well. I saved the arm and hand for last after I worked myself into “the zone.”

Creating Jack – Outline Drawing

This painting was a joy to paint from start to finish. It almost felt as if the brush moved around of its own volition. Fortunately, I have the painting process on video to go back and review, because I honestly do not remember much, after I made my first few decisions. I might need to adjust the far cheek? But I may leave it alone to preserve the freshness. Stay tuned!

Update 1/27/20: I did fix the far cheek (my initial drawing was actually correct). If you open the images in your browser, you can click between them to see the correction unfold, almost like a movie <smile>.

Clark Superboy

Line Drawing.

Portrait #25 for my 30×30 Portrait Challenge. “Clark Superboy” watercolor 11″x7.5 on 140lb Arches cold press. Click on images for a larger view in a new browser tab.

I created this painting and the next one (#26) (see next blog post) over two days. On the first day, I drew the outline drawings directly on the watercolor paper.

The photograph was taken by the boy’s mother, Alethia Harmon, as he was readying himself for Halloween excursions.  Apparently, almost Superboy was fascinated with 3D glasses.  I think he looks like a young Clark Kent transitioning into being Superboy?

I decided to use Triadic Color Harmony, using primary colors, red, yellow and blue. I liked how the blue of the outfit reflected up into the skin tones, hair, and glasses. I used a combination of Cobalt Blue by QoR and Ultramarine Blue by Schminke for the blue tones, Quinacridone Rose, and Raw Sienna Light for the yellow. I used a mix of Rose of Ultramarine and Transparent Pyrrol Orange for the dark hair and all the colors mixed together for the dark of the glasses.

This time I painted wet-on-dry, painting with tea-strength pigment. I started with the dark hair, then moved down to the face, then the underlying blue of the costume. I painted the base of the glasses with blues, so when I added the darks, the blue would be the highlights.  I built up the value layers, thinking the paint. T After staring at this overnight, I realize I need to even up the glasses lenses. Stay tuned.

 

Barista

Barista – Final

Barista – Draft

Portrait #24 of my 30×30 Portrait Challenge. “Barista” 11″x7.5″ watercolor on 140lb cold press. Click on images for a larger view in a new browser tab.

This time, I just did a pencil outline sketch directly on the watercolor paper.

To begin the painting, I saturated the paper front and back. While the paper soaked, I mixed up five piles of paint; Cascade Green, Rose of Ultramarine (RoU), Transparent Pyrrol Orange (TPO), Raw Sienna Light (RSL), and Manganese Blue Hue; all by Daniel Smith.

I dried the paper back to damp before painting. I kept the paint at tea strength to start, painting the eye sockets, neck, light side, and under the chin with the green and blue and glazing with RoU. I used the warm tones; RSL, TPO and RoU for the checks, forehead, mouth, and nose.

I decided the Manganese Blue just did not allow me to get dark enough for the hair, pupils of the eye, mouth, eyebrows, and eyelashes, so I added some Cobalt Blue Violet to the mix. I mixed the blue-violet with orange for a rich dark brown. I used the raw sienna light for the lighter areas of the hair, and the orange for some of the warm shadows. In order to preserve the harmony of the painting, I used green for the apron and mixed it with the two violets for a background. I had fun painting the hair tendrils with calligraphy strokes.

After “staring time,” I’m thinking I will glaze over the green tones a bit with something warm. Stay tuned.

Update 1/27: I worked on this painting more over the last two days. I glazed over the green tones with Raw Sienna Light and Rose of Ultramarine added more darks to the hair, and fiddled with the far eye a bit.

Note: If you click on the images and open them in new browser tabs, you can click between them to see the subtle differences better.

Spiked – Painting

Spiked

Portrait #21 of my 30×30 portrait challenge. Over 2/3rds of the way there. Woot! “Spiked” watercolor on 140 lb Arches cold press, 7.5″x11″. Click on images to see a larger view in a new browser tab.

I began wet-into-wet and intended to do an ethereal and unrealized portrait. Once again, I took it to the “too much” level. Sigh. I used 5 colors this time. Rose of Ultramarine, Raw Sienna Light, Pyrrol Red by Daniel Smith, as well as Ultramarine Blue and Translucent Orange by Schminke. Oh, and some Titanium White.

I started out wet-into-wet and left the paper wetter than I normally do. I painted in value layers from the graphite value study I had done previously. I “pushed” the colors a bit more than they appear in the reference photo, wanting to have a vibrant contrast between the violets and yellows.

Spiked – Graphite 11″x7.5″

I “finished” before completing the painting. I felt dissatisfied with it until I propped it up for display at home. Now I quite like it. This experience usually has the opposite effect. ha!  Though, I still want to bring some of the yellow to the left side of the background and soften a few edges here and there… Oh, and sign it. I usually only sign a painting once I consider it done.

Stay tuned to this blog post for any updates.

Buy Now with PayPal

All these small portraits (7.5″x11) are for sale. $185 (plus taxes and or shipping, where applicable). The price also includes a white black core mat with outside dimensions of 11″x14″ (standard frame opening size), foam core backing and clear cellophane packaging.

With a Blue Streak

“With a Blue Streak”

Portrait #17 of my 30 x 30 Portrait Challenge. “With a Blue Streak” 7.5″x11″ graphite.

This is a preparatory drawing for a watercolor painting. I thought I’d post some progress photos.

Stage 1

Stage 2

First I did contour drawing of the shadow shapes. See “Stage 1′. I shaded in the shadow shapes, either on or off, white or light shadow only.

Stage 3

I then brought in smaller, darker shadow shapes. And voila… out pops the image. It never ceases to amaze me how a face shows up on a blank piece of paper.

Between Stage 3 and the final stage, I made some adjustments to the eyes and mouth.

Click on images for a larger view in a new tab. Next up painting. Stay tuned to find out about that blue streak?

16th Painting 30×30 Direct Watercolor Challenge – Mrs Cluck

Mrs. Cluck – Final Painting

Mrs. Cluck continues my efforts for the Facebook 30x30DirectWatercolor Challenge.

This is a small work created on Arches 140lb cold press, painted without any drawing and wet-into-wet. I used my #14 Lowe-Cornell round brush throughout. Pigments used are Raw Sienna Light, Hansa Yellow Medium, Quinacridone Red, Pyrrol Red and Cobalt Blue (all Daniel Smith).

Mrs. Cluck – 1st Stage

I saturated the paper, then dried it back with a towel (see previous blog posts). I began by painting the shadow side of the bird with Raw Sienna and Hansa Yellow Medium.

Mrs. Cluck  (Headless chicken) – 2nd Stage

I then found the bird by painting around with a background color, using the cobalt and pyrrol red, then dropping in some of the raw sienna as well. This created a silhouette of the main subject. In some places, I purposely let the yellow color bleed into the background color, in other areas I kept a white “reservoir” edge.

Mrs. Cluck (She found her head) – 3rd Stage

To find the chicken’s comb and wattle, I dropped in the Quinacridone Red while the yellow pigment was very wet. After hinting at the head wet-into-wet, I had to let the painting dry back a bit to the damp stage.

Mrs. Cluck – 4th Stage

After the paper was damp (not wet), I painted some darker shadow shapes in an around the chicken’s head.  I added some soft shadow indications in the feathers, legs, and feet.

Mrs. Cluck – Final Painting (Click on image for a larger view)

After the painting had dried some more to almost dry, I touched in some more shadow details to finish the painting.

Mrs. Cluck, 7.5″x5.5 watercolor.  If interested in purchasing this painting, it can be had for a mere $150 (with frame & mat). In July, “Mrs. Cluck” will be “goin’ to the show.” She will be a part of my featured artist show with Artsy Fartsy Art Gallery in Carson City. Check payers and those who live far, far away will incur additional shipping charges. Taxes additional, where applicable.

Mrs. Cluck $150 (with frame & mat)


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